Tag Archives: #ReadHarder

Sophia’s Book Riot Read Harder 2017 – COMPLETE!

This year’s Read Harder was excellent – none of the books I read rated below three stars for me.  Not even the German poetry!  I did hit a bit of a reading rut in June, so sadly I did not reach my original goal of finishing before July.  But I did finish this challenge IN July, I’m just bad about keeping up with posting, despite my sister’s frequent random “blog post?” texts.  Not even her oldest child authority can overcome the inertia of my laziness, muahaha.

Anyway. Here are the highlights from the second half of Read Harder this year:

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The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood – I’ll admit I used the new TV show as an excuse to finally read this, but boy howdy is it terrifyingly relevant, even and especially today.  The story felt timeless and way too possible, making it easy to imagine how smoothly our society could shift in such a direction.  It was totally compelling, and the tension was consistent and constant.  This is definitely a book I plan to revisit.

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi – This book is beautiful and heart-wrenching.  I don’t know how many times I teared up throughout the story, and I full-on cried at the ending.  Yaa Gyasi knows how to WRITE.  Her imagery, her tone, her flow, her ability to plumb the depths of emotion and characterization without weighing down the narrative – I marveled at it all.  This book deserves to be read and read again.  I listened to the audio version, and the narrator absolutely did the text justice.

Pachinko by Min Jin Lee – Another gorgeous book, all quiet subtlety and simplicity.  But underneath that, an edge so hard and sharp  you don’t notice the cut until you see the blood.  This epic family saga moves through four generations of struggle and change, gently lulling you with a steady narrative until it sucker punches you in the gut with little warning or ceremony.  And then the story just moves on.  Rinse and repeat.

Completed Tasks

1) Book about sports – The Fair Fight, Anna Freeman
2) Debut novel – IQ, Joe Ide
3) Book about books – How to Be a Heroine: Or, What I’ve Learned from Reading Too Much, Samantha Ellis
4) Set in Central/South America by local author – Things We Lost in the Fire, Mariana Enriquez
5) By an immigrant/central immigration narrative – Shanghai Girls, Lisa See
6) All-ages comic – Lumberjanes, Vol. 5: Band Together, Shannon Watters
7) Published 1900-1950 – Brave New World, Aldous Huxley
8) Travel memoir – Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, Cheryl Strayed
9) Book you’ve read before – Armada, Ernest Cline
10) Set within 100 miles of your location – The Red Queen Dies, Frankie Y. Bailey
11) Set more than 5000 miles from your location – Pachinko, Min Jin Lee
12) Fantasy novel – Three Dark Crowns, Kendare Blake
13) Nonfiction about technology – Tetris: the Games People Play, Box Brown
14) Book about war – The Girls of Atomic City, Denise Kiernan
15) LGBTQ+ YA or middle grade novel – George, Alex Gino
16) Banned or frequently challenged – The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood
17) Classic by author of color – Go Tell It on the Mountain, James Baldwin
18) Superhero comic with female lead – Ms. Marvel, Volume 1: No Normal, G. Willow Wilson
19) Character of color goes on a spiritual journey – Shadowshaper, Daniel Jose Older
20) LGBTQ+ romance novel – If I Was Your Girl, Meredith Russo
21) Published by a micropress – We Are Legion (We Are Bob), Dennis E. Taylor
22) Collection of stories by a woman – Where Am I Now?, Mara Wilson
23) Collection of poetry in translation, not about love – Duino Elegies, Rainer Maria Rilke
24) POV characters all people of color – Homegoing, Yaa Gyasi

Emmas’ Read Harder 2017

This year, I managed to complete Read Harder in record time – early April instead of high summer. As with previous years, the prompts were diverse and interesting. Some were easy, such as task 12: Fantasy novel, and some were the bane of my book hunting, such as task 23: Poetry in translation, not about love. All in all though, the tasks promoted a good mix of books, many of which I would never have read otherwise.

Emma’s Read Harder 2016
Emma’s Read Harder 2015

Favorites

*The Long Walk: A Story of War and the Life That Follows by Brian Castner
(task 14: About war)
My husband has been after me to read this book since it was first published, and I’m ashamed to say that it took me this long to get around to reading it. The whole book felt surreal. In part because it’s not written on a straight timeline – the narrative moves fluidly though past and present, fractured because Castner was fractured. And in part because I know some of the people mentioned in the book. My husband has worked with people mentioned in the book; he has been to some of their funerals. Castner brings a different perspective, but also reinforces, what I know of my husband’s experiences.

*Hunter by Mercedes Lackey
(task 12: Fantasy novel)
After 27 years of reading fantasy novels, this was the first Mercedes Lackey novel I have ever read. A bit shocking really, given how prolific a writer she is. I loved the intersection of post-apocalypse and magic; how old world technology and terminology have been repurposed and used in conjunction with magic. For all that it’s fantasy, it’s political as well with a huge government conspiracy. Joy is a strong character, and not hot-headed. I had to force myself to not listen to the sequel right away since I want to finish my book challenges first.

*Tetris: The Games People Play by Box Brown
(task 13: Nonfiction about technology)
I chose this book because it looked to be a fast read and because my sister recommended it. I’ve read another graphic nonfiction by Box Brown, and was unimpressed to say the least with both the writing and illustration style. However, my sister was right, and Tetris was an engrossing book. I ended up reading it in one session because it was fascinating – how Tetris was invented, how it made its way out of the USSR, the legal fight between competing game producers, and how Tetris finally became so ungodly popular. Be aware that the book starts with a history of Nintendo before moving on to focus on Tetris. I’m assuming this was to both set the stage for Tetris domination, and because Nintendo was the company that ended up victorious.

Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Córdova
(task 19: Character of color goes on spiritual journey)
This is a book I heard about, read the description, and then told myself it looked interesting, but it wouldn’t be something I read. Thank you Book Riot for making this category, because without it, I would have never read it. Labyrinth Lost was rich and detailed, and the bruja religion was fully developed. The storytelling was beautiful. The only quibble I had had to do with the romance/love interest. It didn’t feel right, sort of like it was there because there should be a romance. It didn’t develop organically, and would have been better left in the friend zone, with the potential for it to grow in future books.

Tasks

  1. About sports: The Ultra Mindset: An Endurance Champion’s 8 Core Principles for Success in Business, Sports, and Life by Travis Macy
  2. Debut novel: Paper Magician by Charlie N. Holmbert
  3. Book about books: The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman
  4. Set in/author from Central/South America: Death Going Down by Maria Angelica Bosco
  5. Written by immigrant/immigration as central narrative: In the Country We Love: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero
  6. All-ages comic: Out from Boneville (Bone #1) by Jeff Smith
  7. Published between 1900-1950: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  8. Travel memoir: Pyongyang: A Journey in North Korea by Guy Delisle
  9. Book you’ve read before: Hellhole by Gina Damico
  10. Set within 100 miles from your location: City of Light by Laruen Belfer
  11. Set more than 5000 miles from your location: A Long Way Home by Saroo Brierley
  12. Fantasy novel: Hunter by Mercedes Lackey
  13. Nonfiction about technology: Tetris: The Games People Play by Box Brown
  14. About war: The Long Walk: A Story of War and the Life That Follows by Brian Castner
  15. LGBTQ+ MG/YA author: George by Alex Gino
  16. Banned/frequently challenged in your country: Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
  17. Classic by author of color: Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
  18. Superhero comic with female lead: Ms. Marvel, Vol 4: Last Days by Willow G. Wilson
  19. Character of color goes on spiritual journey: Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Córdova
  20. LGBTQ+ romance novel: The Lawrence Browne Affair by Cat Sebastian
  21. Micropress publication: The Last Horror Novel in the History of the World by Brian Allen Carr
  22. Story collection by female author: Always Happy Hour: Stories by Mary Miller
  23. Poetry in translation (not about love): View with a Grain of Sand: Selected Poems by Wistawa Szymborska
  24. All POV characters are people of color: The Sellout by Paul Beatty

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Read Harder – March

I had five books left for Read Harder, but I only finished…four. I was really hoping to complete the entire challenge, but #13 – Nonfiction about technology, was my sticking point. Reality is Broken is fascinating, but nonfiction is always slow going for me. It didn’t help that my reading challenge focus was weak, and that I spent a decent chunk of time marathoning two non-challenge series.

Pyongyang: A Journey in North Korea by Guy Delisle
#8 – Travel memoir
This is the second book about NoKo I’ve read this year, and it was interesting to see the different perspectives between the authors. There was about a ten year difference between the two trips, but there was the same general feel of oppressiveness and craziness with both accounts. A big difference though was that Delisle was less inclined to empathize with the people, focusing more on deficiencies (as compared to the Western world) and how they affected him.

A Long Walk: A Story of War and the Life that Follows by Brian Castner
#14 – Book about war
My husband has been after me to read this book since it was first published, and I’m ashamed to say that it took me this long to get around to reading it. The whole book felt surreal. In part because it’s not written on a straight timeline – the narrative moves fluidly though past and present; fractured because Castner was fractured. And in part because I know some of the people mentioned in the book. My husband has worked with people mentioned in the book; he has been to some of their funerals. Castner brings a different perspective, but also reinforces, what I know of my husband’s experiences.

View with a Grain of Sand by Wislawa Szymborska
#23 – Translated poetry, not about love
After looking at reviews online, I seem to be in a definite minority of not liking this book. Her poems were not accessible and most made no sense at all. It was like a lot of obscure and/or complex words were barfed onto the page without regard for how well they expressed a concept. Out of the entire collection, I enjoyed less than 10 poems. I had to force myself to read this because I didn’t want to hunt down another book for this task.

The Sellout by Paul Beatty
#24 – All POV characters are POC
I really enjoyed this book. It was an scathing satire filled with dark humor and absolutely ludicrous. Beatty twisted and used stereotypes to highlight that no matter how much we think we live in a post-racial America, we really don’t.

 

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Read Harder – February

I managed to gun through nine Read Harder books in March, leaving only five left until I complete the challenge. Go laser focus!

Five Final TBR Books

#8 – Travel memoir – An African in Greenland by Tété-Michele Kpomassie
#13 – Nonfiction technology – Reality is Broken by Jane McGonigal
#14 – Book about war – A Long Walk: A Story of War and the Life that Follows by Brian Castner
#23 – Translated poetry, not about love – View with a Grain of Sand by Wislawa Szymborska
#24 – All POV characters are POC – The Sellout by Paul Beatty

Paper Magician by Charlie N. Holmberg
#2 – Debut novel
I wouldn’t have finished if not for the challenge. If Ceony Twill was training to become a paper magician, then the focus should have been about her gaining and using those skills. While she did learn some rudimentary paper magic, the majority of the book took place while she was trapped inside a human heart, learning about her master’s past. Yes, she did use those skills to save his life, but it felt like it was a detail rather than the purpose. There was also no foundation created for her to start falling in love with her master. It happened because it was “supposed” to happen, but there was no legitimate path toward falling in love.

Death Going Down by Maria Angelica Bosco
#4 – Set in South or Central America, written by a South or Central American author
I chose Death Going Down because it was compared to Agatha Christie’s novels. I can see the similarities in tone and description, and the ensemble aspect of the storytelling reminded me of Murder on the Orient Express. It took a little bit of time to get into the book as the opening pages were a bit clunky and confusing. However, the story and writing evened out.

Hellhole by Gina Damico
#9 – Book you’ve read before
I read this book for Read Harder 2015 (#11 – YA). Since then, it’s been hovering in the back of my mind, whispering that I needed to read it again. It’s snarky and sarcastic, and the whole concept of discovering a devil in your basement, eating Cheetos, wearing a velour tracksuit was definitely different from what I’ve come across before. It had a madcap adventure feel to it. I liked how the characters played off of each other, and how Burg slid between helpful and selfish – it was always a bit unclear as how good or bad he actually was.

City of Light by Lauren Belfer
#10 – Set within 100 miles of home
City of Light is set in Buffalo, which is general geographic area of where I live. And if I had realized that Written in Red by Anne Bishop would have fit this category, albeit in an alternate universe, I would have chosen it instead. I had a very hard time reading this book, and had to set “reading goals” like I do for nonfiction in order to finish it. As a transplant to Buffalo, the historical aspects of the story were interesting, but they amounted to information dumps bogging down plot progression. A good 100+ pages could have been axed, which would have helped immensely with making the book more readable. The plot itself was a bit loose, with too many subplots. The main plot – power company murders – had very little page time.

Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
#17 – Classic by an author of color
I first read this book when for an English course when I was 19. I remember loving the book, and it’s been simmering on my TBR list as a reread for quite some time. In the simplest terms, it is about the unnamed narrator’s coming of age. In more in-depth terms, it’s about alienation, invisibility (because of race, because of socio-economic status, because of not living in a way segments of society believe you should, etc…). It’s a powerful book, and I can see why it left such an impression on my 19-year old self.

Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
#16 – Banned/frequently challenged in US
I enjoyed this book more than I probably should have. It was extremely well-written; disturbing, but well-written. Humbert Humbert was vile, but at the same time Nabokov gave him charm, made him a master of deception. HH was constantly justifying his actions to both himself and readers. On some level, he knew it was wrong, but whenever those thoughts bubbled to the surface, he shoved them down before he was forced to acknowledge how reprehensible his actions were. He pushed the blame onto Lolita. A love story this is not. It is a story about abuse and moral depravity.

The Lawrence Browne Affair by Cat Sebastian
#20 – LGBTQ romance novel
I picked this one up because of a mention on Book Riot. It was a nice story, and even if all the romance scenes were cut, would still stand strong. I liked that both men brought the each other out of their respective shells, and allowed each other to be a better person than they thought they could be.

 

The Last Horror Novel in the History of the World by Brian Allen Carr
#21 – Micropress
I first read Brian Allen Carr a few years ago for Read Harder (2015, #4 – Book published by an indie press, Motherfucking Sharks), and loved how weird and completely out there his storytelling was. I figured that I couldn’t go wrong with another BAC book, and I was right. The Last Horror Novel in the History of the World was equally weird and dark and amazing. He has a phenomenal way with words, and doesn’t use more when sparse is perfect.

Always Happy Hour: Stories by Mary Miller
#22 – Collection of stories by a woman
I enjoy reading books with flawed women as main characters, but this was not one of those books. All of the stories were depressing and pointless, and the women blended together to form a single one-dimensional person. They all felt the same, and it made reading the stories a chore. There were also several stories that had gratuitous descriptions or actions that would have had no impact on the plot if removed, but by being left in made it feel like it was there for shock value: “She stands and bends over, makes her anus pulse” is the one that comes to mind (“Big Bad Love”). While it related to a child in a non-sexual way, it had no bearing on the narrative. That being said, there were two stories I almost enjoyed, or at least I could relate to aspects of them: “Always Happy Hour” and “Charts”.

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Sophia’s Book Riot Read Harder – Halfway!

After successfully finishing both major reading challenges last year, I was feeling burnt out and overwhelmed by my ever-growing library pile.  Most of the books I had checked out weren’t applicable to the challenges and they just kept building up, so I decided this year I would take a break from challenges and focus on purging the backlog first.

That plan…it didn’t last long.  Especially after my sister told me she was going to try to finish both Read Harder and PopSugar Ultimate as quickly as possible. I wanted to see if I could reasonably keep pace with her (I’m not cocky enough to attempt racing her – the woman is a reading machine), so here we are.

Fortunately, a lot of the books I had out DID fulfill this year’s challenge tasks – I’m over halfway through Book Riot’s Read Harder and only a few books shy of halfway on PopSugar Ultimate.  It’s been a good year so far too – lots of amazing books already.  Here are some of my favorites from Read Harder:

22318499How to Be a Heroine: Or, What I’ve Learned from Reading Too Much by Samantha Ellis – after experiencing a personal epiphany while visiting the farmhouse that inspired Wuthering Heights, Samantha Ellis decided to re-read some of her favorite books featuring influential heroines.  The result is a funny, fascinating, and often poignant analysis of several classic and popular works (most I’ve read, some I haven’t) that perfectly captures how it feels when we internalize and attempt to emulate beloved characters and narratives.

22295304Shadowshaper by Daniel Jose Older – this book is awesome.  A teenage girl living in Brooklyn discovers she’s part of a supernatural legacy, the Shadowshapers, people who can connect with spirits through art in all its forms.  The imagery is vivid: you really get a feel for the culture, the mythology, and summer in the city.  Sierra is thoughtful, creative, and smart, and the characters surrounding her are just as engaging.  I’m looking forward to reading the rest of the series.  Also, Anika Noni Rose’s narration on the audiobook was fantastic.

25935592Armada by Ernest Cline – this was my reread, but this time I went for the audiobook edition.  I enjoyed revisiting this story (Ready Player One still wins, though), and Wil Wheaton narrates it perfectly.  He brings the characters and the plot to life, using different tones and accents without sounding forced or awkward.  Basically, I’ll read anything Ernest Cline writes and listen to anything Wil Wheaton narrates.

 

Completed Tasks

2) Debut novel – IQ, Joe Ide
3) Book about books – How to Be a Heroine: Or, What I’ve Learned from Reading Too Much, Samantha Ellis
8) Travel memoir – Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, Cheryl Strayed
9) Book you’ve read before – Armada, Ernest Cline
12) Fantasy novel – Three Dark Crowns, Kendare Blake
13) Nonfiction about technology – Tetris: the Games People Play, Box Brown
15) LGBTQ+ YA or middle grade novel – George, Alex Gino
17) Classic by author of color – Go Tell It on the Mountain, James Baldwin
18) Superhero comic with female lead – Ms. Marvel, Volume 1: No Normal, G. Willow Wilson
19) Character of color goes on a spiritual journey – Shadowshaper, Daniel Jose Older
22) Collection of stories by a woman – Where Am I Now?, Mara Wilson
23) Collection of poetry in translation, not about love – Duino Elegies, Rainer Maria Rilke

Read Harder – January

ultra-mindsetThe Ultra Mindset by Travis Macy
#1 – Book about sports
This is as about as sporty as I get. I don’t have a strong interest in sports, and while I know I will never be an ultramarathoner, I am starting to run again. Macy uses anecdotes to illustrate his tenets for how to become a better runner, person, etc… Because it’s a little bit of everything, it isn’t going to be useful for someone looking for hardcore lessons on building endurance, but it’s accessible, telling people they are capable of more than they think they are. It’s a mentality shift, not a physical shift. It’s good motivation for me as a beginner.

invisible-libraryThe Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman
#3 – Book about books
I liked the premise of the book – interdimensional librarian spies saving books – but the execution of the story didn’t really hold my attention. It was alright, but not not as good as I was hoping it would be. There was too much information, too much going on, and even with that…it was still kind of boring. I also didn’t make much of a connection to the characters. There was no growth. I have no interest in reading any of the sequels.

in-the-country-we-loveIn the Country We Love: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero
#5 – Written by an immigrant / immigration as central narrative
I’m not sure how tightly this book fits into the prompt given that it’s more about the long lasting impact the deportation of Diane Guerrero’s parents had on her. Immigration is central in that it is what brought her parents to the United States, and also what tore their family apart. I couldn’t begin to imagine what life was like for Diane, living with the threat of losing her parents hanging over her head, and then how crushing the reality of it was when it actually happened. Immigration is such a complex and controversial topic, and having a personal story that humanizes it is important, especially now.

boneBone, Vol 1: Out from Boneville by Jeff Smith
#6 – All-ages comic
This book has been recommended to me in the past, and the library director I used to work for loves this series. However, I wasn’t able to get into it. The first volume is mostly set up (which isn’t necessarily bad), and while I liked Fone Bone, I didn’t like his cousins. They seem to be the ones who will cause all of the forthcoming trouble. My dislike is mostly my reaction to Phoney Bone and Smiley Bone, but the plot didn’t hold my attention either.

gatsbyThe Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
#7 – Published between 1900-1950
I’ve tried to read this book before, but have never been able to get very far into it before becoming distracted by another book. I decided to give it a go on audiobook (Jake Gyllenhaal as narrator), and found it was much easier to listen to it than to read it. The whole book seemed somewhat futile and the characters selfish. Gatsby’s whole motive for his ostentatious life was to impress a girl with whom he had a summer fling with prior to being shipped off to the trenches, a girl who was as petty and selfish as he was obsessive and insecure. That being said, Fitzgerald did an excellent job skewering various levels of society – the need to climb to the higher strata, and the disdain the higher levels of society had for the lower levels.

long-way-homeA Long Way Home: A Memoir by Saroo Brierley
#11 – Set at least 5000 miles away from your home
So to start, Saroo was five years old when he rode a train across India and ended up alone in Koltkata. My son is five years old. I kept imagining my son in Saroo’s place and couldn’t fathom how he was able to survive. I also found it incredible that he retained enough of a detailed memory to be able to find his hometown on Google Maps 25 years later. In regard to the writing, it was fairly informal and not the content was not overly in-depth. It’s more “this is how it happened” versus introspection.

georgeGeorge by Alex Gino
#15 – MG/YA author is LGBTQ+
While not the most polished book (debuts tend not to be), it’s a much needed book, and age appropriate for the middle grade crowd, either for a child in a similar situation as George, or for children trying to understand a classmate. George is a girl, and her dilemma is the difference between her reality and how others perceive her. I like that she had support from unlikely source (her brother). There is no “lesson”. The story is simply about George knowing who she is and what she wants (to play Charlotte), and having the courage to be both.

hunterHunter by Mercedes Lackey
#12 – Fantasy novel
After 27 years of reading fantasy novels, this was the first Mercedes Lackey novel I have ever read. A bit shocking really, given how prolific a writer she is. I loved the intersection of post-apocalypse and magic; how old world technology and terminology have been repurposed and used in conjunction with magic. For all that it’s fantasy, it’s political as well with a huge government conspiracy. Joy is a strong character, and not hot-headed. I had to force myself to not listen to the sequel right away since I want to finish my book challenges first.

ms-marvel-4Ms. Marvel, Vol 4: Last Days by Willow G. Wilson
#18 – Superhero comic with a female lead
I’ve been somewhat ambivalent towards Ms. Marvel, even though it is excellently written and drawn. It’s more that I have never really liked superhero comics. That being said, I keep reading Ms. Marvel though because of various reading challenges. However, volume 4 is the one that has tipped my ambivalence over into love. It felt like the storytelling has hit finally its stride. Complex and dark, Kamala has to confront a crisis that has the very real possibility of not ending well, and in realizing that she has to learn that superheros can’t save everyone. There were still plenty of clever details in the background, like the random pigs or the rat with a bowler hat or some of the storefront signs, which added some levity. Kamala also has some good scenes with both her mother and Bruno.

labyrinth-lostLabyrinth Lost by Zoraida Cordova
#19 – Character of color goes on a spiritual journey
This is a book I heard about, read the description, and then told myself it looked interesting, but it wouldn’t be something I read. Thank you Book Riot for making this category, because without it, I would have never read it. Labyrinth Lost was rich and detailed, and the bruja religion was fully developed. The storytelling was beautiful. The only quibble I had had to do with the romance/love interest. It didn’t feel right, sort of like it was there because there should be a romance. It didn’t develop organically, and would have been better left in the friend zone, with the potential for it to grow in future books.

Reading Challenges of 2017

Let’s just start with this, shall we?

read-all-the-books

Because this is essentially what 2017 is going to look like for me. It’s a whole new year, and even though my book love was dragging at the end of 2016, I am ready and motivated and will do my damnedest not to get distracted by other books until I have finished all the challenges. Two weeks in, and my willpower is still holding, even though I desperately want to give in to some sequels that keep calling my name.

Book Riot’s 2017 Read Harder Challenge
Of course this one is at the top of the list. Twenty-four categories of awesomeness, and books for 16 of them are already in my house. I am lifting my “no rereading” ban this year, because Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison (#17 – Classic by author of color) has been on my TBR for years. I read it 17 years ago for a college English class, so I’d like to think enough time has passed that it’s alright to reread it.

This year will also be different in that my husband won’t be participating. He is back in school, so fun reading has been mostly sidelined for him. Sophia will be late joining the party – she has a massive TBR stack of library books that need to be read and returned (she works at a library, so no late fees, which unfortunately encourages book hoarding tendencies).

What am I excited about this year? Well beyond the fact that I already have over half the books at home, the categories feel more challenging this year. Micropress? Nonfiction about technology? Set within 100 miles of where I live? There are some good categories for sure.

PopSugar 2017 Reading Challenge
The behemoth got a bit bigger this year. In addition to the normal 40 categories, they upped the ante by adding 12 more in their “advanced” reading list. I am not going to let myself touch the advanced list until I’ve finished the normal one (though I have already chosen six of the books). The ante was also upped with the categories they chose. They feel much more rigorous, more horizon-expanding. I’m going to have to dig for a few of these – “story within a story”, “month/day of the week in the title”, “book bought on a trip”.

PopSugar was my Achilles heel last year. I didn’t finish it until the evening of December 31st. My reading motivation was down the drain, and even though I could have had it done months earlier, I kept getting distracted by other reading challenges or other non-reading challenge books. The latter being the main culprit. “I will not get distracted” is my reading challenge mantra for 2017.

Bookish: 12 Ways to Kill your TBR this Year
I saw Bookish’s challenge last year, but didn’t add it to my challenge list because, well…I was already participating in three of them. One more seemed a bit much. This year, however, I am adding it to the happy family that is Emma’s obsession with reading challenges. Both Sophia and my step-mom will (hopefully) be participating as well. I really hope my step-mom does as it is not as hard as other challenges. Twelve books in twelve months. A different theme each month. Very doable. It will help to make a small dent in my TBR mountain.

YALSA’s The Hub Reading Challenge
No link for this one yet since it hasn’t come out yet (probably towards the end of January, like last year). I am excited to see what books are on it this year. It definitely expanded my YA horizon. I tend to stick with YA fantasy and graphic formats, so this challenge forced me to read a larger slice of the YA pie. Like last year, my aim is at least 25 books, but not every book.

Emma’s Amazon Challenge
This one stems from the fact that I have 1000+ books sitting in my “books to read” wishlist on Amazon. The struggle is real. Some of these books will be removed from the list because of other reading challenges, but once I’m done with those (minus Bookish), my goal is to start knocking these bad boys out. Not the whole thing, of course. It would take me three years of dedicated reading to do that, as the list currently stands.

 

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